Friday, October 14, 2011

31 Days of Holiday Baking - Day 14 :: Pumpkin Patch to Pie

Good Morning!


Have you ever wondered how to take a glorious pumpkin from the pumpkin patch and make it into a pie? I'll take the mystery out of it for you in three words: bake. purée. sieve. Why would you do it yourself when you can buy it in a can? A couple reasons! 1) It tastes fresher and much better. 2) It's way cheaper. I purchased Sugar Pie Pumpkins from Wisbey Veggies for only $1 each and each one makes about the equivalent of 1.5 large cans that you'd buy in the store. The last time I looked at cans of pumpkin they were $3.59 each!

When you're buying pumpkins for eating, the smaller the better. Ask at the veggie stand or pumpkin patch which pumpkins are for pies and they'll be able to tell you. The ginormous ones are generally grown for decorating and the small darker orange ones are better for eating. 


The how to:

  1. Wash all the dirt off your pumpkins.
  2. Cut them in quarters.
  3. Remove all the stringy stuff and seeds. Save the seeds for roasting.
  4. Put the pumpkin pieces on a baking sheet (with sides as there could be quite a bit of liquid!).
  5. Cover with tin foil and bake at 375° for about an hour and a half or until the pumpkin is very tender.
  6. Cool.
  7. Purée with a food processor or food mill.
  8. Push it through a sieve to ensure it is completely smooth and lump free.
  9. Another tip suggested by Susan is:  put a cheese cloth in a collander and put the cooked and puréed pumpkin in that and set it over a pot. Let the excess liquid drip overnight. When you let that extra water drip out it is closer to the canned pumpkin and you can substitute in canned pumpkin recipes.
  10. Use in recipes that call for pure pumpkin!
  11. Freeze in measured out portions in freezer bags or plastic containers.
A few recipes to try:





This circa 1994 Costco TV cabinet was looking
tired, worn and let's face it, hideous! I gave it a
fresh coat of Sherwin Williams Halcyon Green
paint and it's as good as new!
Our favourite pumpkin patch!
Pumpkin Scones
Pumpkin Pie - this can also be made in store bought or homemade tart shells or even in mini canning jars like we did for Thanksgiving.



While you're being all domestic, why not plan to fill your freezer with turkey stock the next time you cook a turkey? I did that the other day with the Thanksgiving turkey carcass! I'm going to use some of that stock in my Christmas gravy. Yum. If you're not into cooking turkeys, you can make stock out of a rotisserie chicken carcass. 


I'd love to know if you give pumpkin puréeing a try and how it turns out!









~Cindy 
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2 comments:

  1. Cindy, I buy pumpkins for baking and cooking every year -- I feel so bad for the carved and thrown out pumpkins! One thing that I would add to your instructions is that I put a cheese cloth in a collander and put the cooked and pureed pumpkin in that and set it over a pot. I let the excess liquid drip overnight. When you let that extra water drip out it is closer to the 'canned' pumpkin and you can substitute in canned pumpkin recipes.

    And now I think of it, I think I need a couple more pumpkins...

    ReplyDelete
  2. @Susan Being Snippy Thanks for the tip, Susan! I will add it to the instructions. Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete

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